• Are we listening?

    In the past several weeks, a suburb of Damascus has become the newest epicenter of the Syrian Conflict. The opposition-held Eastern Ghouta, which is about to enter its fifth year under siege, has been bombarded by hundreds of airstrikes, surface-to-surface missile attacks, artillery bombs, as well as reports of chlorine...
  • An outbreak of underdevelopment

    Brazil’s states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, three of the most developed, have recently gone through an outbreak of yellow fever, a disease transmitted by mosquitoes, which can have deadly consequences. More than a health issue inherent to any tropical place like Brazil, it has...
  • How will Ethiopia it find its next leader?

    At the end of the men’s marathon race at the Rio Olympics in 2016, the second-place finisher trotted across the finish-line, sweats streaming down his face, and solemnly raised his hand to form a cross above his head. The gesture was lost on many of the viewers watching around...
  • Women empowerment in conflict

    Despite the conflict present in Libya since 2011, a rapid spread of entrepreneurship and startups among Libyan women has contributed to the effort to rebuild the state in the regions where peace has been established. Among these strong women is a young Libyan lawyer named Hala Bugaighis. Bugaighis co-founded the first...
  • Crackland Brazil

    Working through the Brazilian cracklands

    According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Brazil consumes 18% of the world’s cocaine, in spite of accounting for less than 2% of the world’s population. This puts Brazil in the 2nd position in the world ranking of cocaine consumption, just behind the US....
  • Peace talks and miscommunication in Palestinian Territories

    Peace Talks and Miscommunications in the Palestinian Territories

    In November, Israeli Police arrested a Palestinian man in response to what was believed to be an unsettling Facebook post.  The post, which pictured him leaning against a bulldozer in the Beitar Illit settlement, was followed by a caption that led officers to suspicion. Police officers were worried “he...
  • How you can help children without volunteering in an orphanage

    Recently, Words in the Bucket (WIB) published an opinion piece, titled, “to stop the institutionalization of children, stop volunteering in orphanages.” This piece argued that the increase of foreigners wanting to volunteer with children in developing countries has led to an increase in orphanages and, subsequently, the number of...
  • Overfishing causing food insecurity in Senegal, and it’s all about China

    This isn’t a competition small-scale fishermen are going to win on their own. In a study by Frontier in Marine Society, researchers have found China catches more fish in a week than Senegal does in a year....
  • Forgotten or ignored: the conflict in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains

    Mohamed Adam stared at the burnt rubble in front of him, oblivious to the heat of the noonday sun as he surveyed all his hard work, his home and food storage preparations, destroyed in a matter of minutes. A melted cassette can be seen peeping out of the ash...
  • Striving for progress in the shadow of a civil war

    The conflict Sierra Leone’s civil war was a long and brutal affair.  In addition to rebels and military combatants, over 50,000 civilians died between 1991 and 2002, and numerous others were maimed and abused.  Formed out of discontent following the country’s independence in 1961, the rebel group Revolutionary United...
  • The making of a creative debate in Tunisia

    Tunisia has recently shown promising achievements, such as the new law against gender-based violence that was passed at the end of July 2017, making Tunisia the leading country in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region in women’s rights. However, the fact that the political revolution in Tunisia...
  • What you should know about the Universal Basic Income

    Universal basic income (UBI) has increasingly and excitedly being advocated by both academics and activists in the fight against unemployment, poverty and income inequality. More than by academics and activists, it has been advocated also by some of the world’s biggest tech companies. This apparent odd convergence of interests...
  • Digital humanitarianism: old logics, new networks

    Humanitarian aid is often at the centre of debates about efficiency, corruption and costly bureaucratic procedure. Digital technology seems to offer an alternative to centralised aid governance by allowing people to take direct initiative such as in the case of crowdfunding; participate in decentralised peer-to-peer systems allowed by blockchain...
  • Young mother with children at Nyamebekyere clinic in Ghana. Source: Flickr

    The importance of family planning

    If you are a woman of reproductive age, there is a 64 percent chance that you use some form of contraception. In Europe, this figure is 80 percent, while in the United States, latest statistics reveal that there is approximately a 62 percent chance you are using contraception. While...
  • Can planting trees bring social change to Tunisia

    Green hope

    Tunisia is, after Jordan, the second country in the Mediterranean area to be most affected by drought and dryness. Not only is it the smallest country in the Maghreb, it is also the one with the least reliable water resources. Aware of this problem and with the intention of...
About us

Words In The Bucket is a team of global citizens with the common goal of raising awareness and information about issues related to human rights protection, social inclusion, development and environment.

We are "Rethinking World Thinking"

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