Diego da Silva Rodrigues

Diego da Silva Rodrigues

Diego is an applied economist interested in policy evaluation and quantitative methods. His main interests are around family issues, such as marriage, parenting, gender, fertility and children, being member of the International Network of Child Support Scholars (INCSS) and the Parenting Culture Studies Postgraduate Network. Diego has also publications in migration and health economics, and is currently involved with human rights and democracy activism in South America. At present, he is completing his PhD at the University of Kent, UK, and is lecturer in Economics at IESGO, Brazil.
    • Brazilian women's football

      The “F” word: In the country of football, can female players find true support?

      Brazil proudly declares itself the “country of football”, where this sport represents a national passion which moves both minds and hearts. However, this passion is not completely felt by Brazilian women yet. In the country with the highest number of men’s world championships (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994 and 2002),...
    • Photo: Agência Brasil Fotografias/CC BY 2.0/Flickr

      Brazil’s long-lasting prison massacre

      October 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of the Carandiru massacre in Brazil. On 2 October 1992, to control a prisoner riot, military police invaded São Paulo’s House of Detention, known as Carandiru, officially killing 111 prisoners. Twenty-five years on, the consequences of the Carandiru massacre continue to emerge, with...
    • Brexit migration

      The Brexit of the non-EU immigrants

      The crescent inflow of immigrants into the UK was one of the main points of debate, even before the Brexit discussion started. Eventually disguising to contain economic and political reasons, the immigration issue certainly played a key role on the referendum which decided for UK’s exit from the European...
    • What you should know about the Universal Basic Income

      Universal basic income (UBI) has increasingly and excitedly being advocated by both academics and activists in the fight against unemployment, poverty and income inequality. More than by academics and activists, it has been advocated also by some of the world’s biggest tech companies. This apparent odd convergence of interests...
    • Is Brazil missing the conversation about child marriage?

      A World Bank recent study pointing to the costs of child marriage has brought again to the media the enormous costs this social phenomenon has for the welfare system worldwide. Despite being part of the Sustainable Development Goals, ending child marriage is still a far target to be achieved...
    • A selective racism

      The world is living one of the worst migration crisis in history. This topic is constantly on the political agenda, with national governments and international organizations addressing it in their speeches and policies. While prejudice against immigrants was somewhat hidden in the arguments for the exit of the United...
    • A troublesome miscegenation

      Brazil is well known for its mix of cultures, religions, colors and races. According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), there are 305 officially recognized indigenous ethnicities, in addition to those brought in by historical, regular migratory waves from Europe, Asia, Africa and, more recently, from...
    • The most beautiful street in the world

      Anyone who flies over Porto Alegre, the capital of Rio Grande do Sul in the south of Brazil, cannot overlook what seems to be a “green river” across one of the most traditional districts of the city below. That “green river” is in fact a short, picturesque street fully...
    • Back to basics

      The importance of basic education, both primary and secondary, has increasingly occupied the academic literature, highlighting its relevance for economic development. Higher educational levels result in higher levels of labor productivity, which in turn, relate to higher levels of income. The universalization of basic education is often pointed out...
    • Two decades of gender austerity

      In a period when fiscal austerity has strongly returned to the international economic agenda, Brazil started 2017 putting into practice a plan which has been considered one of the most rigorous ones currently in the world. This plan, approved by Brazilian parliament last year, freezes government spending for twenty...
    • A tough choice

      The dilemma of balancing family and career is still faced by many women, particularly by those who are mothers. The social norms related to the traditional gender division of labour say women are responsible for housework and childbearing while their male partners shall provide maintenance to the household through...
    • Transferring empowerment

      Since 2013, India is gradually implementing the Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT), a scheme which soon will be the largest cash transfer program in the world. It basically consists in transforming former government subsidies, especially the ones related to food and fuel, into direct cash transfers to the neediest people,...
    • Brazil to start all over again

      Rio’s 2016 Olympics finished on August 21st. Ten days later, Brazil’s former president Dilma Rousseff was impeached. The event, which a large portion of the population thought symbolized the entry of the country into the hall of developed nations, was merely the end of one more of its political...