Guillaume Biganzoli

Guillaume Biganzoli

Guillaume is a French-American dual Master candidate with Sciences Po Paris and the London School of Economics studying International Relations and Security. Currently based in Paris, he has also gained professional experience in the United States and Belgium. Guillaume specializes in the Middle East and North Africa region and has previously written for The Caravel, Georgetown University's international newspaper, and the LSE Middle East Centre Blog. He is passionate about the Arabic language and cinema, Model UN and human rights issue.
    • Why peace in Yemen could depend on women

      The war in Yemen, often called “the forgotten war,” has caused the death of over 10,000 people, including many civilians. Today, over 18 million people are in need of humanitarian aid and the country is facing one of the most severe famines to date and the world’s worst epidemic...
    • Bolivia’s water wars

      In the current reality, water is a privilege. Today, more than one billion people live in water-scarce regions. According to a recent World Bank report, because of climate change, rising consumption, and growing populations, up to 3.5 billion people could face water scarcity by 2025. Bolivia has become one...
    • Jaded

      The failure to effectively regulate the extraction of a country’s natural resources is a policy problem which has ignited and fueled numerous conflicts throughout history. To this day, failure of effective governance remains a major source of human rights abuses and environmental degradation. From Sierra Leone’s blood diamonds to...
    • Saving traditional print media

      “Only a newspaper can put the same thought at the same time before a thousand readers…So hardly any democratic association can carry on without a newspaper.” In 1835, it already became evident to Alexis de Tocqueville, author of this quotation, that print media had, and would probably continue to have a central part...
    • DDoS SOS : freedom of press threatened by cyber attacks

      On October 21st, customers of Dyn, a Domain Name System (DNS)-services provider, were targeted by a massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack. DNS is an essential component of Internet services since it transcribes websites into numerical addresses enabling their location and identification between computer services and devices. DDoS attacks hamper this process...
    • A heart of blood: Muslims crowd French prisons

      For a long time now, the overwhelming presence of Muslims in the French carceral system has been vividly criticized. Today, in light of recent terrorist attacks and fear of growing radicalization, this issue raised by this observation becomes more vital than ever. The high rate of Muslim incarceration constitutes...
    • Crescent and croissants: the difficult history of French Islam

      The crescent and the croissant are respective symbols of Islam and France. At first glance, they might not seem to have a lot in common, but the croissant, arguably one of the most famous pillars of French culture and cuisine, was originally created by the Austrians and shaped like a crescent in...
    • Aung San Suu Kyi: a democratic dictator?

      In a previous article for Words in the Bucket, contributor Laura Naude convincingly pleaded for the recognition of the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. Naude concluded her piece on a hopeful note, stating that “the recent open elections and the possibility of Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi...
    • A new era for humanitarian organizations?

      Médecins Sans Frontières or MSF ( also known as Doctors Without Borders), one of Europe’s biggest humanitarian organization, has recently released a statement criticizing the European Union’s (EU) “deterrence policies and intensifying attempts to push people and their suffering away from European shores,” and the signing of the EU-Turkey...