• Skyline of an industrial park Photo by MonikaP (CC0 Creative Commons)

    Creative destruction: the future of a nation’s development

    One of the most fundamental characteristics of a modern society is to secure the requisite to survive this constantly evolving world whilst adapting to technological advances.  Given the enormous challenges of facing a future of rapid change and ushering a one-tiered oil and gas economy like Trinidad and Tobago’s into a technological...
  • On becoming a gentle man

    Open the door for her, carry heavy stuff, offer her your seat, pay the bill, pick her up and make sure she comes back home safe. As a Latino, cisgender, heterosexual, privileged man, raised in a Catholic culture, women are subjects of devotion and objects of desire. They are...
  • Could Brazil be heading for a far-right government?

    During the past years, Brazil has been featured in several international newspapers, though not always for great reasons. After the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics, the country has made headlines for several corruption scandals, the controversial impeachment of president Dilma Rousseff and the increasing violence against marginalised...
  • Will LGBTQ+ rights be on the agenda of the new Mexican government?

    Mexico is one of the most progressive countries in Latin America in terms of LGBTQ+ rights today. A recent study found that it has, in fact, had more openly LGBTQ+ politicians and has passed more anti-discrimination legislation than the USA. The same study also found that in Mexico, identifying...
  • Brazil must reckon with its violence against black youth

    “Mom, I know who shot me, I saw who shot me. It was the police, mom. Didn’t they see my school uniform?” These are the words that Marcus Vinicius Silva said to his mother before he died. Silva was 14, he was shot and killed last 20th June as...
  • What remains after the football matches end

    Just as today in Russia, in 2014 Brazil hosted an edition of International Federation of Football Association (FIFA) World Cup. Since that time, the country has been immersed in a debate about rights and social policies with important economic and political implications. Contradictorily, as some of the most passionate...
  • Photo by Nicolas Raymond

    The environmental consequences of regional nuclear warfare

    In May, the 2018 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) was held in Geneva. The NPT came into existence in 1970 to help prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and further the global nuclear disarmament agenda. Every five years, countries that are part of...
  • Is the future of AI inclusive?

    “The idea is that we are building our own MIT here,” says Roya Mahboob, founder of Digital Citizen fund, and one of the first Afghan women to become CEO of a tech company in the country. The project she is referring to is something she has envisioned since she began...
  • The Philippines: quest for national identity

    The history of the Philippines has been permeated by foreign influences, namely Spain, the United States and Japan. The centuries-old colonization introduced a lot of  deadweight, a type of excess baggage in the Philippines’ understanding of itself. The quest for self-identity has been pervasive, making it difficult for Filipinos...
  • Nigeria’s ‘weather wars’

    Thousands of people have been killed due to increasing violence in central Nigeria, where herdsmen and farmers have been fighting over access to fertile lands. Herdsmen – mainly Muslims from the Fulani ethnic group – accuse farmers of grabbing grazing lands and of stealing and killing their cattle. On...
  • Credit: Shop Catalog - www.shopcatalog.com / CC BY 2.0 / Source : Flickr / resized

    Is Facebook threatening your ability to protest?

    Have you ever noticed how the ads you see on Facebook can be spookily relevant to you? Maybe you’ve been shopping for a tent online, and suddenly your newsfeed is populated with adverts for tents, or you’ve been chatting with someone in another country and then finding travel adverts....
  • Brazil: Mired in Venezuela’s crisis

    In February 2018, the government of the northern Brazilian state of Roraima required the country’s supreme court to close the border with Venezuela to prevent more immigrants from entering into Roraima. According to the municipal authorities of Boa Vista, Roraima’s capital, there were already approximately 40,000 Venezuelan immigrants living...
  • Philippines shuts down Boracay island: all for a casino?

    On the 9th of February 2018, during a conference held in Davao City, the President of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte threatened to close the country’s most sought out destination island of Boracay due to environmental concerns. Whilst it’s inhabitants we’re kept in limbo – a spokesman of the President,...
  • How will Ethiopia it find its next leader?

    At the end of the men’s marathon race at the Rio Olympics in 2016, the second-place finisher trotted across the finish-line, sweats streaming down his face, and solemnly raised his hand to form a cross above his head. The gesture was lost on many of the viewers watching around...
  • “For no longer than necessary”: the issue of immigration detention in the UK

    The UK is the only member of the European Union that has indefinite immigration detention. Only until September, 2017 had seen over 27,000 people put into detention centres under the government’s new migration policies, according to the Amnesty International. Nonetheless, last week, Home Office minister Brandon Lewis faced criticism...
About us

Words In The Bucket is a team of global citizens with the common goal of raising awareness and information about issues related to human rights protection, social inclusion, development and environment.

We are "Rethinking World Thinking"

Subscribe