Sunita Basnet

Sunita Basnet

Sunita is a Ph.D. candidate in the Human Geography programme at the University of Waikato. Her current research investigates place-based experiences and feelings of (not) belonging amongst Bhutanese women and girls living in New Zealand under the third country resettlement programme referred by UNHCR. She is also a member of international organizations such as One Young World and World Pulse. In 2010, she was honoured as International Women’s Health coalition (IWHC) Young Visionary Award. In the same year, she received the World Pulse Citizen Journalism Award. Her area of expertise includes qualitative methods, gender issues, women's empowerment, migrants and refugees studies, home spaces, identity and belonging. She has been working in various women-related organizations for almost a decade.
  • Inside the World’s Happiest Country

    Bhutan, officially known as the Kingdom of Bhutan, is a small landlocked kingdom located between China and India in South Asia. The country, as we all know, measures the Gross National Happiness (GNH) instead of relying on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as the only way to measure the country’s...
  • After I lost my sight I got the vision of my life!

    Shristi KC, the founder of ‘Blind Rocks!’, an organization with a purpose to change the way society and individuals portray disabled people. Shristi shares how losing her sight at the age of 16 gave her a vision in life. My name is Shristi KC and I was born in Bhaktapur,...
  • Scarred for Life

    As Mao Tzedong said, “Women hold up half the sky”, but until recently violence against women and girls has lacked reliable statistics and surveillance systems. Acid throwing, also known as acid attack, has emerged as a new brutal form of violence against women that involves the throwing of sulphuric,...
  • Women Rights Movement: A Journey Through Time

    Women’s issues captured attention only in 1962, when the United Nations (UN) General Assembly asked the women’s commission to prepare a report on the role of women in the social and development plans. The reasoning behind this was that economic and social development would enhance women’s status. As a...