Maria Jose Oomen Liebers

Maria Jose Oomen Liebers

María José is an interdisciplinary social science researcher. She holds an MPhil in Social Anthropology from the University of Cambridge and an MSc in Public Policy and Human Development with a focus in Migration Studies from the Maastricht Graduate School of Governance and UNU-Merit (the Netherlands). In the past, she has worked for the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), covering a range of topics such as women’s labour conditions in urban areas, south-south migration flows in the regions of Africa, the Pacific and the Caribbean, post-disaster recovery and the role of women, and strategies for upward social mobility among middle-income population strata. Currently, she holds a research position at the Institute of Criminology of the University of Cambridge, supporting the set-up of a planned multi-site longitudinal study exploring violence against children.
    • Photo by: Nessie Spencer / (CC BY-SA 2.0) / Source: Flickr

      Feminism: more than just a fashion trend

      In the aftermath of the Women’s March on Washington big fashion brands saw a market opportunity. Dior, inspired by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie´s essay, was one of the first to tailor their spring 2017 collection to the “feminist cause”, with t-shirts reading “WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS”, across the front....
    • Should Bolivia condemn extractivism?

      Extractivism is a mode of economic accumulation that consists of the removal of raw materials from the natural environment. European colonialism entailed the mass-scale extraction of natural resources from various regions, providing for the development of the world economy. In his book, Indian Givers: How the Indians of the...
    • A man’s job?

      It has been suggested that the concentration of women in certain occupations reflects their own preferences, which in turn stems from the belief that these occupations are compatible with traditional gender roles and socialisation processes that predispose them towards certain types of jobs. Is this entirely true? What happens...